[grads] [Sem-coll] Applied Math Colloquia Next Week

Joe Millham jmillham at iit.edu
Thu Mar 3 23:29:45 CST 2011


Please join the Applied Math department for the following Seminars and
Colloquia.  All are welcome to attend, and refreshments will be served
at some events.  For a complete and updated listing of the
department's seminars, please visit the seminar webpage:
http://www.iit.edu/csl/am/colloquia/

Department Colloquium
Monday, March 7   4:40 pm E1 106
Dan Apley, Northwestern University
"Engineering Response Surface Metamodeling Using Fractional Brownian
Fields (and Other Kriging Fixes)"
See abstract below
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Department Colloquium
Tuesday, March 8    12:40 pm   E1 102
Mike Weimerskirch, Macalester College
"How to Bake the Real Numbers from Scratch:  An Introduction to
Surreal Analysis"
See abstract below
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Department Colloquium
Wednesday, March 9  4:40 pm   E1 106
Lek-heng Lim (University of Chicago)
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Department Colloquium
Thursday, March 10, 12:40 pm  E1 102
Grethe Hystad (University of Arizona)
"The Periodic Ising Model"
See abstract below

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Department Colloquium
Monday, March 7   4:40 pm E1 106
Dan Apley, Northwestern University
"Engineering Response Surface Metamodeling Using Fractional Brownian
Fields (and Other Kriging Fixes)"
Abstract:
Kriging has emerged as the method of choice for metamodeling
engineering response surfaces generated via computer simulation.
Although Kriging has many desirable characteristics, it also has some
undesirable ones. When implemented with a stationary spatial random
field (SRF) model, the response prediction reverts to the mean as the
predicted location strays from the simulated locations. Moreover, SRF
models that give a reasonable predicted surface often give
unreasonably narrow prediction intervals. In this talk, we discuss two
fixes for these problems. The first uses fractional Brownian fields
(FBFs) as the SRF model, and the second (which we call dual-model
Kriging) uses two separate SRF models – one to fit the predicted
surface and the other to fit the prediction error variance. We argue
that FBFs, although not nearly as widely used as stationary SRF
models, are very attractive choices for engineering response surface
modeling. We also argue that there is little reason to fit the
predicted surface and the prediction error variance using a single
model, if the response surface is not truly an SRP, and that
dual-model Kriging often provides more reasonable quantification of
the prediction uncertainty.
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Department Colloquium
Tuesday, March 8    12:40 pm   E1 102
Mike Weimerskirch, Macalester College
"How to Bake the Real Numbers from Scratch:  An Introduction to
Surreal Analysis"
Abstract:
Based on the work of John H. Conway “On Numbers and Games”. The talk
discusses the methods of Dedekind and Khinchin constructing the real
numbers. Both assume the existence of some other set (rationals in the
case of Dedekind, integers in the case of Khinchin). The elegance of
Conway's construction is that the real numbers, and much more, are
created with out any assumptions. The "and much more" is the key to
winning at checkers and other games.

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Department Colloquium
Thursday, March 10, 12:40 pm  E1 102
Grethe Hystad (University of Arizona)
"The Periodic Ising Model"
Abstract:
The Ising model is one of the most studied models of modern physics.
Since its introduction in 1925 by E. Ising, more than a thousand
research papers have been published on the subject. The model has had
great success in shedding light on the existence of phase transitions
at a finite temperature. The simplicity of the model made it possible
to obtain exact mathematical results in the thermodynamic limit of
statistical mechanics. In this talk I will introduce the Periodic
Ising model and give a brief review of its history and some of its
applications. Then I will describe some recent results connected to
the correlation functions of the model.




see you there,
Joe Millham

Administrative Assistant
Department of Applied Mathematics
Illinois Institute of Technology
Engineering-1 Room 208
10 W. 32rd St.
Chicago IL 60616
312.567.8984 (Phone)
312.567.3135 (Fax)


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